Black & African-American Affinity Group

Black students walking to class at the Gainesville campus

Since before the Civil Rights Era, the African American community has used the right to assemble as not only a powerful tool to address discrimination and affect social change but also as a way to uplift and encourage one another through adversity. An important part of that rich history has taken place on America’s campuses both large and small. 

That’s why, working together with the NCTC Black Student Union, NCTC has formed the Black Student Affinity Group which seeks to continue this tradition and promote Black student success. 

Use the NCTC app to connect with our Black student population and advocates of the Black community!

Connect with Affinity Groups two ways:

Reach out to an Advocate below or download the NCTC App to start connecting with NCTC students in this group right now!

Get the NCTC App

Affinity Group Advocates

Franklin Haskins

Franklin Haskins
fhaskins@nctc.edu
(972) 899-8400, ext. 8506 

“As an African American male, I know firsthand the struggles young African American male have trying to navigate higher education. I want to be an advocate, a resource and a mentor to these students.  I want to personally help these students through completion of college. This is needed because statistics show that African American males everywhere are struggling to complete their degree and excel in higher education. Let’s work together to prove that these statistics don't know anything about you.”

Ashley Fleeks

Ashley Fleeks
afleeks@nctc.edu
(940) 668-7731 ext. 4955 

“I personally wanted to take on the Affinity Group for African American women because that is who I am. I know what it is to live in poverty. I know what it is to have to find my own way, because I am the first in my family to go to college, graduate, and pursue graduate school. I know what is to not have anyone who looks like you, try to help you and fail because they don't understand you or your journey. I am grateful for this opportunity to impart, advise, and lead more African American women on their purposeful journey. It is important that the youth in our community can physically see people like themselves contributing to society, and just maybe their footsteps will reach higher ground than mine ever could.”

Danee Mitchell

Danee’ Mitchell
damitchell@nctc.edu
(972) 899-8417

“As a Black woman, I can personally relate to being a minority in a college setting. I can remember many times being the only person of color in my college classes and feeling like I did not belong. Luckily, I had people in my corner that helped me and reminded me that I could do it! I hope to be able to pay it forward and make a positive impact on students that had similar experiences to me.”